Kaspar & Lugay LLP
Mail Icon Call: 415-889-8734

Young enough for "gray divorce"

Neil Young's place in rock history was secured with decades of poignant ballads and thrashing, guitar-fueled rockers. Never a slave to musical fashion, Young is nevertheless part of a marital trend known as "gray divorce."

Back in 2014, the 71-year-old music legend asked his wife of 36 years for a divorce. Like so many other members of his generation, Young decided that a new start is what he needed.

His wife, Pegi, 63, has struggled to deal with a divorce she never saw coming. Despite the "rough patch" the couple was enduring at the time, she says, "I never would've thought in a million years we would be getting divorced."

The singer has belatedly launched a solo music career of her own, and recently released a new album.

The song titles alone give a good idea of what was going through her mind as she worked on the project: "Gave My Best to You," "Too Little Too Late" and "Lonely," for instance. She also covered Dolly Parton's "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" and Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'."

On her ranch south of San Francisco, she told a reporter that the songs tell a story of "the seven stages of grief. You've got anger, then shock and disbelief." She says she is not there yet, but she's working toward acceptance of the end of her decades-long marriage.

Media outlets have reported that the divorce rate for Americans 50 and above has doubled since 1990, and more than doubled for those who are 65 and above. About one out of every four people going through a divorce in the U.S. is age 50 or older.

For those facing divorce, the prospect can be daunting regardless of age. An experienced Marin County family law attorney can help protect you and your interests in matters of property division, child custody and more.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information
Back to Top

Request a consultation

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy